Artwork for “Higgs: The God Particle, Found”

Sayo Studios: Science News - Higgs Boson Cover Image

Cover artwork for Science News article on the Discovery of the Higgs Boson, by N.R.Fuller of Sayo-Art LLC.

The Higgs boson has been the Holy Grail of physics since its proposal in the 1970s, so the announcement of its discovery on July 4th from scientists at CERN marked a watershed moment within the history of physics.

I’m excited to be a small part of the history by getting to create the artwork for the Science News cover and article on the subject.

When I first began my illustration career I interned at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and got a crash course in particle physics.  I don’t get to attempt the impossible and draw sub-atomic particles as much as I used to, so this was an exciting return. And luckily for me, the editors at Science News had clear ideas on what they wanted illustrated for the topic — as much as I love tackling conceptually difficult subjects, it’s great to have some help when it comes to particle physics.

The cover artwork for the July 28th issue of Science News shows the vigorous shaking of the field needed for the Higgs particle to ‘pop’ out.

The Higgs particle has been sought for 20 years, since 1973 when it was first proposed. The Large Hadron Collider was completed in 2008, at a cost of 9 billion dollars, largely with the hope of discovering the Higgs (or not). Billions of dollars to discover one particle? The Higgs particle isn’t called the God particle for nothing. It is the lynchpin of modern theories, that couldn’t be verified until now.

The discovery of the Higgs Boson particle could be an important first step towards understanding the 96% of our universe that is made up of dark matter and dark energy, the 96% that still remains mysterious and unknown.

Still, whatever comes in the future from this discovery, July 4th 2012 will certainly be remembered as a landmark day within physics and the scientific community as a whole.

Early Solar System Artwork in Science News Magazine

Early Solar System Cover Art

A cover and opener illustration for Science News article on the Gas Giants in the early days of our Solar System. © Nicolle Rager Fuller

Check-out the cover art and opener for the “Born Gas Giants” article in Science News Magazine, describing recent developments in our understanding of the solar system.

You can see more of the art up-close here: SayoStudio and read the Science News article written by Nadia Drake here (available for anyone to read now, but will only be available to subscribers once a new issue comes out): http://www.sciencenews.org.

The task was to create two illustrations, one for the cover and one for the opener, about updates to the Nice model (Nice as in Nice, France) which explains how the giant gas planets positioned themselves in our outer solar system. When the theory was first proposed in 2005 a few things were still left unexplained. The cover art focuses on a possible 5th outer planet, similar in size to Neptune and Uranus. Its presence helps explain how an early Earth’s trajectory was changed so that it didn’t go crashing into Venus. This extra gas planet played a dangerous dance with Saturn and Jupiter, eventually leading to it’s ejection from the solar system.

The opener feature art focuses on how the gas giants–Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus–were able to so quickly attain their size. This current theory postulates that 3-4.5 billion years ago the planets were much closer together, and they lacked the standard orbits they have today leading to a lot of jostling. As the early gas giants moved, they were able to collect the debris that were thickly distributed in the younger solar system, with Jupiter even stealing some that would otherwise have allowed Mars to become larger.

Welcome to Sayo Studios

Welcome to Sayo Studios, the blog of Nicolle Rager Fuller, the artist behind Sayo-Art. The aim of Sayo Studios  is to provide you with the latest updates on the newest artwork from Nicolle, along with news updates, behind-the-scenes features, advice for young artists, and opinion and analysis on the latest developments in the worlds of art and science.

As an introductory post we have included some examples of the different kind of work that Sayo-Art produces. From taking you down into the world of molecular cancer research to helping you imagine the end of the world scenario known as the “big rip,” Sayo-Art presents you with new ways of seeing and imagining the world. Sayo-Art makes old ideas new and exciting and gives you the ability to understand complex ideas and theories that you could only read about before.

In order to view the rest of each gallery, merely click on an image, and you will be transported to Sayo-Art’s portfolio website and the accompanying images. Included in each image is a brief description of the kind of work that can be found within each gallery. To view more of Nicolle’s work you can check out her portfolio and you can purchase prints and posters at her store. For any questions or comments, Nicolle can be reached via email at: info@sayo-art.com.
Prehistoric Creatures: Dinosaurs, from the plesiosaur to the Majungatholus atopus, shown in their natural habitats. Here, an unlucky dinosaur looks on while an enormous asteroid hurtles towards earth’s surface.
Sayo Studios: An Unlucky Dinosaur Waits for Asteroid ImpactUnique Digital Landscapes: Stretching from the distant past to the theoretical future, this gallery serves up various imaginings of conceptual landscapes. Images include an illustration of a world connected through smart-grid technology and another illustration that depicts the crashing of an asteroid which led to the formation of a crater within the Chesapeake Bay.
Sayo-Studios: A Blue Globe Representing Smart-Grid Technology

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Wonders of Space & Cosmology: These images take complex, theoretical astrophysicsand makes them tangible through art. Ideas like string theory and the creation of the universe are illustrated in this gallery. Below, an example of what the end-of-world scenario known as the “big rip” might look like.

Sayo Studios: One End-Time Scenario: The Big Rip

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species: A selection from the over 1,000 original drawings in the graphic adaptation of Charles Darwin’s on the Origin of Species, published by Rodale. Illustrated by Nicolle Rager Fuller and written by Michael Keller. Nominated for 2 Eisner awards. The book can be purchased from Amazon here.

Sayo-Studios: Cover, Darwin's On the Origin of Species

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Advances in Cancer Research: Sayo-Art provided all of the illustrations for the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2011, which depicted the newest advances in cancer research. This gallery depicts the various ways Sayo-Art takes complex molecular-level science and makes it easy to understand.

Sayo Studios: Cancer Treatment Drug Design

© Nicolle Rager Fuller