Early Solar System Artwork in Science News Magazine

Early Solar System Cover Art

A cover and opener illustration for Science News article on the Gas Giants in the early days of our Solar System. © Nicolle Rager Fuller

Check-out the cover art and opener for the “Born Gas Giants” article in Science News Magazine, describing recent developments in our understanding of the solar system.

You can see more of the art up-close here: SayoStudio and read the Science News article written by Nadia Drake here (available for anyone to read now, but will only be available to subscribers once a new issue comes out): http://www.sciencenews.org.

The task was to create two illustrations, one for the cover and one for the opener, about updates to the Nice model (Nice as in Nice, France) which explains how the giant gas planets positioned themselves in our outer solar system. When the theory was first proposed in 2005 a few things were still left unexplained. The cover art focuses on a possible 5th outer planet, similar in size to Neptune and Uranus. Its presence helps explain how an early Earth’s trajectory was changed so that it didn’t go crashing into Venus. This extra gas planet played a dangerous dance with Saturn and Jupiter, eventually leading to it’s ejection from the solar system.

The opener feature art focuses on how the gas giants–Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus–were able to so quickly attain their size. This current theory postulates that 3-4.5 billion years ago the planets were much closer together, and they lacked the standard orbits they have today leading to a lot of jostling. As the early gas giants moved, they were able to collect the debris that were thickly distributed in the younger solar system, with Jupiter even stealing some that would otherwise have allowed Mars to become larger.

Career Talk: Finding Your Niche

Following Your Passions to Find your Niche; Career Talk at Lewis and Clark College

Sayo Studios: Protein Synthesis Inside a Eukaryote CellI’m excited to share my story of transition from science-geek to a science-art-geek-hybrid at my alma mater, Lewis and Clark College, on Friday the 13th (oooo) at 3:30pm. I’ll get to talk a little bit about combining two seemingly disparate subjects (why, science and art of course) and hopefully offer some inspiration to those searching for their own weird combination. On Saturday I’ll follow it up with an introductory workshop on 2d and 3d Digital art. If you’re an LC student find-out place, time and register here: college.lclark.edu/offices/alumni/saa/events/.

Career Talk N.R. Fuller Lewis & Clark

Career Talk from N.R. Fuller of Sayo-Art LLC on combining your passions and finding your niche at Lewis and Clark College, April 13th, 3:30.

In light of the upcoming talk, I’ve been contemplating how my career path may be applicable to those with differing interests. The more I think about it, the more I realize that career happiness on a day to to day basis (and thus success… but that’s a whole ‘nother post) is largely based on PROCESS. Yes, I’ve found a way to combine two subjects I’m interested in, but I’ve also found a job that suits my personality for day-to-day activities.

From a young age we’re encouraged to think in terms of subject matter, and the jobs that relate to those subjects (well, perhaps other than the Village People’s set of careers) . Often it’s not even related to what subjects you ENJOY, but instead focused on what you’re good at. Of course, what you’re good at and what you enjoy are often one in the same, but for those out there searching for their (next) career path I’d argue reassessment might be helpful based on a couple of other factors…) A few examples that have been relevant for me:Sayo Studios: An Asteroid Finds an Unlucky Dinosaur

  • Detail or Generalist? Are you detail oriented and like plenty of time for a thorough job (mildly anal-retentive), or like me are you a big picture person who wants a quick turn-around so you can be passionate about a project for a defined time, and then BE DONE (mildly messy, flighty, and easily bored)?
  • People Person? Do you thrive being part of a team, or are you content being a lone wolf (like me, which is why I may go days not talking to anyone other than my 2yr old and husband)?

I’ll stop with the comparisons before getting too myers-brigg-ish, but you get my point. In retrospect it’s pretty clear why a bench scientist job wasn’t my perfect fit. The ideals of science–like learning how things work–great! Doing it in a methodical way and daily troubleshooting why your results are unintelligible? Not the perfect fit… for me. You may have noticed in the bullet list I included some negative descriptions in parenthesis. I think we’re sometimes handicapped from seeing and truly understanding ourselves, because Sayo Studios: An Ocelot Hunts An Agouti in Panamawe’ve learned to equate a specific trait with the negative description rather than the positive (what, me messy?). If you can learn to consider the positive side, it may allow you to accept the direction of your true potential. I know, a lofty goal. On the flip side, if we can learn to accept the negative description as well, it’s easier to recognize potential pitfalls, AND easier to laugh at ourselves. (Here’s to trying!)

Since we’re discussing negativity, another hang-up that took me awhile to get past were my narrow definitions of different fields. When I was younger I definitely fell into the rigidly idealistic category. I didn’t see art as a viable option, because I saw it as a black and white choice between being a poor, misunderstood ‘true-artist’ (yet another post for another time), or a commercial artist whose career and work would be entirely dictated by others’ wants (commercial = bad, to my young brain). Obviously, my sweeping generalizations were way off, but moreover it kept me from really learning what the jobs entailed. I crept into the commercial art field through the side-door, and it wasn’t until I turned around and realized I WAS a graphic artist that I really understood what it was all about and what I really digged: visual problem solving and communicating and taking someone else’s story to depict it visually.

So I guess in the end, remember to reassess what your limits are… they may just be your strengths, and reconsider paths you might have initially rejected.

Welcome to Sayo Studios

Welcome to Sayo Studios, the blog of Nicolle Rager Fuller, the artist behind Sayo-Art. The aim of Sayo Studios  is to provide you with the latest updates on the newest artwork from Nicolle, along with news updates, behind-the-scenes features, advice for young artists, and opinion and analysis on the latest developments in the worlds of art and science.

As an introductory post we have included some examples of the different kind of work that Sayo-Art produces. From taking you down into the world of molecular cancer research to helping you imagine the end of the world scenario known as the “big rip,” Sayo-Art presents you with new ways of seeing and imagining the world. Sayo-Art makes old ideas new and exciting and gives you the ability to understand complex ideas and theories that you could only read about before.

In order to view the rest of each gallery, merely click on an image, and you will be transported to Sayo-Art’s portfolio website and the accompanying images. Included in each image is a brief description of the kind of work that can be found within each gallery. To view more of Nicolle’s work you can check out her portfolio and you can purchase prints and posters at her store. For any questions or comments, Nicolle can be reached via email at: info@sayo-art.com.
Prehistoric Creatures: Dinosaurs, from the plesiosaur to the Majungatholus atopus, shown in their natural habitats. Here, an unlucky dinosaur looks on while an enormous asteroid hurtles towards earth’s surface.
Sayo Studios: An Unlucky Dinosaur Waits for Asteroid ImpactUnique Digital Landscapes: Stretching from the distant past to the theoretical future, this gallery serves up various imaginings of conceptual landscapes. Images include an illustration of a world connected through smart-grid technology and another illustration that depicts the crashing of an asteroid which led to the formation of a crater within the Chesapeake Bay.
Sayo-Studios: A Blue Globe Representing Smart-Grid Technology

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Wonders of Space & Cosmology: These images take complex, theoretical astrophysicsand makes them tangible through art. Ideas like string theory and the creation of the universe are illustrated in this gallery. Below, an example of what the end-of-world scenario known as the “big rip” might look like.

Sayo Studios: One End-Time Scenario: The Big Rip

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species: A selection from the over 1,000 original drawings in the graphic adaptation of Charles Darwin’s on the Origin of Species, published by Rodale. Illustrated by Nicolle Rager Fuller and written by Michael Keller. Nominated for 2 Eisner awards. The book can be purchased from Amazon here.

Sayo-Studios: Cover, Darwin's On the Origin of Species

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Advances in Cancer Research: Sayo-Art provided all of the illustrations for the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2011, which depicted the newest advances in cancer research. This gallery depicts the various ways Sayo-Art takes complex molecular-level science and makes it easy to understand.

Sayo Studios: Cancer Treatment Drug Design

© Nicolle Rager Fuller