Wasp Microbial Landscape – Art Process

Our bodies are made up of the trillions of cells encoded by our unique DNA–right? Current research is diving into another rabbit hole, with suggestions that the microbes that coexist with us are just as much US, as our ‘own’ DNA encoded cells. For every one of our DNA encoded cells, 10 microbes exist. For Science News magazine’s special feature on animals’ microbiomes I created a wasp ‘composed’ of microbes. Check out SN’s reporting here, Microscopic Menagerie for more on the science and links to other artists’ great illustrations. In this blog post, you’ll find insights into the my process creating the wasp art.

wasp microbes drawing

Wasp microbiome art created for Science News magazine © N.R.Fuller.

 

wasp-sketchGetting Started on the Art: I almost always start with a sketch to confirm both composition and accuracy. In this case the wasp was a Nasonia wasp (a small parasitoid). After sketching the wasp itself, I sketched microbes onto the very front of the specimen as an example of where I was headed. Science News agreed that it was on track, but gave me some feedback like avoiding monoculture areas like I originally had in the eye.

wasp-zsphere

On the top are the underlying Zspheres used to create the model, and below is the sculpted wasp.

Even though we wanted the final style to look more hand-drawn and less computer generated, I decided to use 3d software to help me with the overall shading and the nuances of the microbial shading. My plan was to spend some time sculpting the wasp, then harness computing power to scatter the microbes, and finish up with sketched details in Photoshop. I started out using Zbrush’s zspheres to create the underlying shape of the wasp. If you’re not familiar with zspheres, they’re a fantastic way to quickly create a mesh (model) without traditional polygon modeling skills. It’s basically like stringing together beads to create your shape.

Zspheres remind me a little of the newish kid’s building toy Zoobs; essentially balls with connectors, of which any of the balls can become a joint. As I built my wasp I kept each major part separate as a Zbrush subtool so that I could easily modify the pose. Once the structure was created I sculpted the details of the wasp, using primarily a combination of the sculpting slash, inflate, and move tool. Since I knew that I’d be adding the microbes I didn’t need a whole lot of detail, I just wanted to define the body contours.

Next up, sculpting microbes

microbes-inprocess

When I first envisioned creating this art I planned to use zbrush to sculpt a base wasp, and then Cinema 4d’s mograph module to populate the surface with microbes, or perhaps even Vue’s ecosystem function (*TIP* Vue’s ecosystem function, meant to populate trees and plants across a landscape, also works well to scatter objects).  I quickly realized that the scattershot microbe approach wasn’t working. For the microbes to really look integrated and one with the wasp, I needed to selectively place the microbes according to the contours and the specific part of the body–more rod bacteria on the legs, strings of cocci along crevices, etc… It’s of course possible that if I had the programming knowledge I could have made the shotgun method work, but I don’t, so… my quick computer solution quickly turned into a VERY time consuming process of hand placing each microbe using Zbrush’s insert mesh tool (still very cool that it’s even possible with Zbrush).

I sculpted each variety of microbe (a few different rod bacteria, cocci, spiral…) and created a custom insert brush so that I could place them across the wasp’s body. In some places where less detail was needed I used an alpha brush with a mix of microbes as a texture, although in most places this proved to be too low resolution. After I had most of the microbes placed I turned on polypaint, so that I could individually paint the color of each microbe, and further added texture with noise textures (alpha brushes).

Putting it All Together

Now that I had my wasp composed of microbes, I rendered several different styles using zbrush’s built-in materials and imported them into Photoshop. Different materials emphasize different lighting, reflection, highlights… so I ended up compositing several different renderings to get the mix of colors and shading that I was looking for using several photoshop layer mix modes (overlay, color, multiply…). In the image below you can see several of the different lighting/material renderings from Zbrush that I composited in Photoshop.wasp-head-3ds

With the base microbes-wasp complete I continued to refine the art in photoshop. I used the photoshop stamp tool to duplicate some of the microbes into spots that were left a little bare in the zbrush renderings and I added some extra color to help it pop a bit more. With the help of Science News’ great art direction, I looked for parts that were flattening out and  then hand-drew (on my cintiq tablet) hatched shading to emphasize the distinction between microbes and highlight the overall body shape. Below left is the final color base made up of several different composited renderings. Below center is the line-work I drew and on the right is the final art with the drawn line-work on top of the color.

wasp-head-final

Thanks for checking out my work and my process. If you happen upon this and would like more info on specific programs or techniques in future posts, please let me know and specify what level of information in the comments.

 

Artwork for “Higgs: The God Particle, Found”

Sayo Studios: Science News - Higgs Boson Cover Image

Cover artwork for Science News article on the Discovery of the Higgs Boson, by N.R.Fuller of Sayo-Art LLC.

The Higgs boson has been the Holy Grail of physics since its proposal in the 1970s, so the announcement of its discovery on July 4th from scientists at CERN marked a watershed moment within the history of physics.

I’m excited to be a small part of the history by getting to create the artwork for the Science News cover and article on the subject.

When I first began my illustration career I interned at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and got a crash course in particle physics.  I don’t get to attempt the impossible and draw sub-atomic particles as much as I used to, so this was an exciting return. And luckily for me, the editors at Science News had clear ideas on what they wanted illustrated for the topic — as much as I love tackling conceptually difficult subjects, it’s great to have some help when it comes to particle physics.

The cover artwork for the July 28th issue of Science News shows the vigorous shaking of the field needed for the Higgs particle to ‘pop’ out.

The Higgs particle has been sought for 20 years, since 1973 when it was first proposed. The Large Hadron Collider was completed in 2008, at a cost of 9 billion dollars, largely with the hope of discovering the Higgs (or not). Billions of dollars to discover one particle? The Higgs particle isn’t called the God particle for nothing. It is the lynchpin of modern theories, that couldn’t be verified until now.

The discovery of the Higgs Boson particle could be an important first step towards understanding the 96% of our universe that is made up of dark matter and dark energy, the 96% that still remains mysterious and unknown.

Still, whatever comes in the future from this discovery, July 4th 2012 will certainly be remembered as a landmark day within physics and the scientific community as a whole.

How It Works – Extinction, Ecosystems, & Traffic Jams

These new illustrations by Sayo-Art for How It Works Magazine demonstrate the ways graphics and text can be integrated to create features that are simultaneously compelling and educational. SayoStudios works hard to create illustrations custom fit to your layout and space needs for text. Below, each image is shown by itself and then in the magazine layout, exhibiting how the client incorporated the artwork with the captions and labels. There are various ways images and text can enhance each other, and Sayo-Art can help by giving you the art as a framework to build upon, work the art around already formatted text, or insert and design the copy you provide.

Below is an illustration depicting the chain of events set off by the asteroid credited with killing the dinosaurs over 65.5 million years ago, sans any labels or supporting text.

The asteroid credited with killing the dinosaurs set off a long series of cataclysmic events. Modeled using Eon Vue and digitally painted with Adobe Photoshop for How It Works Magazine. © Nicolle Rager Fuller

And here it is within the magazine:

Sayo-Art works with each client to decide what illustration style best suits the particular topic. From the detailed, technical illustration demonstrating the science behind shock absorbers in cars:

To the more natural, but equally detailed illustration for the myriad connections within a pond ecosystem:

To view the full project of images in high quality please check out Sayo-Art’s portfolio website at: sayostudio.com. You can also like Sayo Art’s facebook page and follow on twitter: @SayoStudio.

Early Solar System Artwork in Science News Magazine

Early Solar System Cover Art

A cover and opener illustration for Science News article on the Gas Giants in the early days of our Solar System. © Nicolle Rager Fuller

Check-out the cover art and opener for the “Born Gas Giants” article in Science News Magazine, describing recent developments in our understanding of the solar system.

You can see more of the art up-close here: SayoStudio and read the Science News article written by Nadia Drake here (available for anyone to read now, but will only be available to subscribers once a new issue comes out): http://www.sciencenews.org.

The task was to create two illustrations, one for the cover and one for the opener, about updates to the Nice model (Nice as in Nice, France) which explains how the giant gas planets positioned themselves in our outer solar system. When the theory was first proposed in 2005 a few things were still left unexplained. The cover art focuses on a possible 5th outer planet, similar in size to Neptune and Uranus. Its presence helps explain how an early Earth’s trajectory was changed so that it didn’t go crashing into Venus. This extra gas planet played a dangerous dance with Saturn and Jupiter, eventually leading to it’s ejection from the solar system.

The opener feature art focuses on how the gas giants–Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus–were able to so quickly attain their size. This current theory postulates that 3-4.5 billion years ago the planets were much closer together, and they lacked the standard orbits they have today leading to a lot of jostling. As the early gas giants moved, they were able to collect the debris that were thickly distributed in the younger solar system, with Jupiter even stealing some that would otherwise have allowed Mars to become larger.

Welcome to Sayo Studios

Welcome to Sayo Studios, the blog of Nicolle Rager Fuller, the artist behind Sayo-Art. The aim of Sayo Studios  is to provide you with the latest updates on the newest artwork from Nicolle, along with news updates, behind-the-scenes features, advice for young artists, and opinion and analysis on the latest developments in the worlds of art and science.

As an introductory post we have included some examples of the different kind of work that Sayo-Art produces. From taking you down into the world of molecular cancer research to helping you imagine the end of the world scenario known as the “big rip,” Sayo-Art presents you with new ways of seeing and imagining the world. Sayo-Art makes old ideas new and exciting and gives you the ability to understand complex ideas and theories that you could only read about before.

In order to view the rest of each gallery, merely click on an image, and you will be transported to Sayo-Art’s portfolio website and the accompanying images. Included in each image is a brief description of the kind of work that can be found within each gallery. To view more of Nicolle’s work you can check out her portfolio and you can purchase prints and posters at her store. For any questions or comments, Nicolle can be reached via email at: info@sayo-art.com.
Prehistoric Creatures: Dinosaurs, from the plesiosaur to the Majungatholus atopus, shown in their natural habitats. Here, an unlucky dinosaur looks on while an enormous asteroid hurtles towards earth’s surface.
Sayo Studios: An Unlucky Dinosaur Waits for Asteroid ImpactUnique Digital Landscapes: Stretching from the distant past to the theoretical future, this gallery serves up various imaginings of conceptual landscapes. Images include an illustration of a world connected through smart-grid technology and another illustration that depicts the crashing of an asteroid which led to the formation of a crater within the Chesapeake Bay.
Sayo-Studios: A Blue Globe Representing Smart-Grid Technology

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Wonders of Space & Cosmology: These images take complex, theoretical astrophysicsand makes them tangible through art. Ideas like string theory and the creation of the universe are illustrated in this gallery. Below, an example of what the end-of-world scenario known as the “big rip” might look like.

Sayo Studios: One End-Time Scenario: The Big Rip

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species: A selection from the over 1,000 original drawings in the graphic adaptation of Charles Darwin’s on the Origin of Species, published by Rodale. Illustrated by Nicolle Rager Fuller and written by Michael Keller. Nominated for 2 Eisner awards. The book can be purchased from Amazon here.

Sayo-Studios: Cover, Darwin's On the Origin of Species

© Nicolle Rager Fuller

Advances in Cancer Research: Sayo-Art provided all of the illustrations for the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2011, which depicted the newest advances in cancer research. This gallery depicts the various ways Sayo-Art takes complex molecular-level science and makes it easy to understand.

Sayo Studios: Cancer Treatment Drug Design

© Nicolle Rager Fuller